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Monthly Archives: January 2017

  • When Keys get stuck in car ignition

    Posted on January 30th, 2017 0 Comments

    There’s many reasons that car keys sometimes get stuck inside the ignition of the vehicle. If it occurs constantly, it’s most likely a structural issue with the ignition switch itself. There’s a large chance that there’s some sort of wire or button inside the structure that houses the ignition mechanism that’s misaligned, preventing the key from turning to the fully disengaged position where it can be removed. This counts as a full jam in the device – but if you jiggle the key around or lightly hit the steering column, the key can be released.  Here’s Chicago Locksmith’s automobile expert’s guide to stuck car keys.

    Locked Steering Wheels

    There’s other situations where there’s no inner structural malfunctions, but the steering wheel itself is locked in a closed position. In these situations, you just need to slightly rotate it left or right to help release the key. Another tactic to implement is to check to see which direction the car’s wheels are turned to, and turning the steering wheel in the other direction. When cars get parked with their wheels facing opposite directions, it can put great pressure on the steering wheel making it jam. When you release it with this method, there’s a loud click, signaling that the ignition is freed up.

    Manual Removal

     

    You might be trying to move your key when it breaks off inside the car ignition. Try to use pliers to manually yank out the part of the key that you have access to. If you don’t see it, try applying a small amount of superglue to the head of the key that broke off, stick it inside so it can touch the part that broke it off, wait a few minutes, and pull it out. REMEMBER: only use a small amount of superglue, as if it get’s into the mechanism it can break it.

    If the key is STILL stuck, it’s probably due to a shifter mechanism malfunction. In this situation you will need the help of a professional. Call a licensed car repair service as soon as possible, as these malfunctions can cause airbags to suddenly be deployed, which can be quite dangerous.

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  • Brief School Safety Statistics

    Posted on January 6th, 2017 0 Comments

    School safety has become a hot button issue in the news media. Here’s Chicago Locksmith’s brief guide to some of the safety statistics that define security in our nation’s schools, as reported through data gathered by the Journal of School Health, and the National Center for Education Statistics.

     

    • Metal detectors reduce the chances of weapons being carried within the school by 5.8 percent, and one being carried while heading to or leaving school by 7.5 percent.

    • When asked if security officers should search student with metal detectors, 40 percent of boys and 57 percent of girls said yes – in total, 49 percent of children surveyed.

    • Administrators estimated that violent crime was reduced by 32 percent, drug crime by 14 percent, with an overall crime reduction of 32 percent.

    • 3 percent of students between 12 and 18 said they were scared of being attacked inside or on their way in and out of school during the school year, with the same amount of children mentioning having the same fear when school is out.

    • Between 85 and 89 percent of public schools reported crimes, with about 65 percent of those cases being reported to the police.

    • Vandalism was recorded as occurring between 46 and 49 percent of the time.

    • 9 percent of teachers reported being threatened with violence by students.

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  • Building Exit Devices

    Posted on January 4th, 2017 0 Comments

    In order for commercial buildings to stick to official fire prevention and building codes, it’s essential that you have proper exit devices in place in order to keep all building occupants safe.

    These rules change based on how many occupants are inside the building. Door exit devices are usually installed on the side of the door that swings out to open, in order to prevent any sort of unauthorized access while allowing for full free egress.

     

    These systems were first implemented  in the USA after a slew of deadly building fires, notably the terrible Uroquois theatre fire of 1903. Exit devices were made to open outwardly, to accommodate the rapid flow of people who may be rushing to leave a building.

     

    Correctly Installed Exit Devices

    There’s 3 commonly used varieties of exit devices that get used today: mortise lock exit devices, vertical rod exit devices, and rim lock exit devices. Rim locks are the most commonly used variety, and are named after the rim lock latches commonly sold in the early 1900s in the East Coast and in the Midwest. These locks get mounted on top of the secured area of the door frame, and have a latch that is positioned over the surface strike.

     

    Mortise lock exit devices are made of a mortise lock sans deadbolt, which are usually attached within the door’s pocket. As the push bars get pushed in, the tail shaft (otherwise known as a spindle) turns which releases the latch bolt and lets the door open.

     

    Bolt type exit devices are fairly new mechanisms; when they are locked, they cause the deadbolt latch to move to touch the strike, minimizing the space between the bolt and the strike.

     

    Panic bars

    All exit devices are either non fire rated (panic bars) or fire rated exits. Panic bars are made up of a door latching mechanism, and an activation mechanism that causes the door to unlatch, opening up in the direction of the egress opening whenever a force is placed on it. The panic latch has to have an unlatching force which is a maximum of 15 pounds, and it has to be able to get operated by any regular person, as opposed to someone with specialized training.

     

    Fire Rated Exit Bars

    These door latches can get fitted onto fire proof doors, and help provide a barrier for smoke or flames. These doors are self-closing and automatically latching, but they can’t ever get locked from opening to the outside while anybody is inside the building.

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