Call Now!

888-562-5691


888-lock-ny1
Our Emergency Service is Available!

Tag Archives: Lock Installation Chicago

  • Different Type of Lock Grades

    Posted on July 3rd, 2020 0 Comments

    Different locks are measured according to different Grades. These Grades help residential and commercial property owners determine what the general security level a lock provides. In this brief blog post, the lock installation experts here at Chicago Locksmiths will provide some detail as to the different types of lock grades.

    (more…)

    Share Button
    Author:
  • The Effect of Door Hardware on Curb Appeal

    Posted on May 17th, 2020 0 Comments

    According to a research study conducted at Princeton University, it takes only 1/10th of a minute for people to set impressions of other people; and this same fact applies to how your home, and it’s curb appeal, is judged by strangers. Lock hardware can actually make a big impression on the curb appeal of your property – and, of course, the myriad of factors that curb appeal in turn effects. In this blog entry, the lock and door hardware installation experts here at Chicago Locksmith will detail the way that lock hardware has a strong effect on curb appeal.

    (more…)

    Share Button
    Author:
  • Padlock History

    Posted on April 17th, 2016 0 Comments

    Padlock History

    Locks are a matter of ancient history – they have existed for thousands of years, since the beginning of society. As history has progressed, the structure and construction of locks have changed. The invention of the padlock was one of the most influential changes in the evolution of locks. The important idea at the center of padlocks is the invention of a lock that can be added and removed from a separate device. Padlocks are simply detachable locks that can be secured with a shackle – which is put on a hinge or springed slide. In this brief blog post I’ll underline some of the important history and etymology of padlocks.

     

    The Etymology of the word ‘Padlock’

    Some theories imply that the prefix ‘pad’ means gate, with the implication that padlocks were originally made for locking gates. The prefix ‘pad’ could also imply foot traffic, or walking, implying that these locks were originally crafted to guard gates that led to paths. In the United Kingdom the term ‘Pad’ is also associated with ‘panniers’, baskets used with animals. This implies that perhaps the term padlock originated to describe the locks that merchants would place on bags of their wares that they would attach to animals to carry. The last theory asserts that the term came from Vikings in an English settlement who would use these locks to keep their livestock secure inside containers known as paddocks.

     

    Ancient Rome

    The most ancient padlocks currently on record date to 500 BCE, in the Roman empire. This artifact has around body made of iron, with a bolt that can be moved with a key. Many other Roman padlocks are made of two parts with a rectangle body, with a separate shackle and V shaped spring – the two far corners of the ‘V’ are pinched in order to allow the shackle to move. This construction is rudimentary but effective.

     

    Evolution along the Silk Road

    As trade routes between Europe and Asia were established, the use of locks became much more widespread as they were enlisted by merchants. By the year 25, the Chinese Empire had implemented massive use of padlocks – these often made of bronze. A few hundred years later in the English province of York, Viking settlements used padlocks to protect their livestock. Leading archeologists argue that these locks were made between the years 850 and 1000 – and as I mentioned before, were used on animal paddocks. The viking padlocks are structurally similar to the Roman padlocks however the Viking ones used flat keys, rather than the “L” bent Roman ones.

     

    Mid-Millennium England

    The most drastic changes to the structure of the padlock happened as they became more widely used in England. This evolution was spearheaded, funnily enough, by the use of smokehouses to preserve food. Before refrigerators, citizens needed methods of preserving food for long harsh winters. Smoking meat and fish became a method of rendering food much more impervious to the elements – and as food was in high demand, smokehouses would have to be locked to prevent the food from being stolen. These padlocks were made of wrought iron, and had custom keyways – warded with notches that matched keys. These padlocks however widely disseminated, had structural issues – they could be forced into, and it would be incredibly difficult to figure out if the lock had been picked.

     

    Eastern Europe

    In Eastern Europe – in Slavic areas like Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, etc..) the advent of the screw key padlock provided an alternative to the smokehouse padlock. This cylindrical key has to be twisted into the lock, and if it aligned properly it could be taken out without having to turn it the opposite way, at the same time stretching an internal spring which would retract the bolt. By around 1910 both screw key locks  and smokehouse locks stopped being as popular.

     

    1800s Scandinavia

    Invented by the Swedish inventor Christopher Polhem, the Scandinavian lock consisted of a series of rotating disks with side grooves that would match with a certain key – additionally grooves on the outside of the disks had to align in order to release the shackle. Created in the 1870s, these locks continued to be manufactured until around the 1950s.

    Also invented in Scandinavia, Cast Heart padlocks, made of brass or bronze, were made with a keyway drop, to protect it from being impacted with particulate matter, and could be easily carried. They were widely manufactured due to their usefulness in incredibly cold or icy climates.

     

    Industrial Revolution and Advent of Electricity

    During the 1870s, the Cast Heart lock became widely replicated with cheap materials. Many businesses began using the cheaper locks, even if they were less effective. During this time period, Yale was creating the first padlock that was made of modular components that could be replaced – allowing for rekeying. As electricity came to use, manufacturing of solid metal locks became cheaper and easier – and modular locks became a trend on an industrial level. Shrouds that cover the shackles also came to use.

     

    MasterLock

    In the 1920s the Master Lock company released their tumbler and pin based padlock -and manufactured them in droves. The simplification of cast dieing processes made it a possibility for companies to manufacture locks with ornate molds and designs – however due to this embellishment causing functional issues, this trend has mostly disappeared. However, padlocks have become ubiquitous – to the point of becoming a universal symbol of security. Even if new designs of more useful or efficient locks are made in the future, the impact of the padlock will live on in semiotics.

    Share Button
    Author:
  • Safe Glossary

    Posted on March 23rd, 2016 0 Comments

    Name Brand Safes

    The majority of people’s conception of security extends to only door and window locks, but it’s a fact that protecting your valuables inside interior safes add an essential additional level of protection. For the peace of mind knowing that your valuables are being adequately protected, there’s no better bet than a safe. Whether you need to protect heirlooms, jewelry, or documents like birth certificates or business records, security safes will protect your assets like no other hardware can. There’s a number of different categories of safes; in this blog post I’ll detail the various types, and what they’re best for.

     

    Fire Resistant

    These safes protect their inner contents from high temperatures, and are given ratings according to the amount of time that they can survive fire temperatures while not letting the internal temperature rise above a certain amount. These safes range in fire safety duration from a half hour to four hours – safes installed within concrete floors are the safest, however since these safes are not watertight, they may fill with water from hoses or sprinklers in case there’s a fire. To be safe, place all items within fire resistant safes inside plastic bags.

     

    Diversion Safes

    This ultra basic safe is hidden within a normal household object like a book, a can, or even a wall outlet. These safes are meant to blend in among the rest of household items, and should be left among real versions of their corresponding objects.

     

    Jewelry Safes

    These – usually small – safes are specifically meant to store the eponymous jewelry or other small valuables – they are both burglary and fire proof, and usually have well appointed interiors made with fine wood or fabric – and sometimes with internal drawers or cabinets.

     

    Environmentally Resistant

    These safes are made to be waterproof – they can withstand extended underwater submersion for extended amounts of time.

     

    Burglar Resistant

    These safes are rated based on their ability to withstand the typical variety of tools that burglars use during break ins – they are rated based on the amount of time that they can withstand aggressive attack. These safes, while structurally resistant to forced entry, are not primed for water or fire resistance.

     

    Smart Safes

    These safes are designed to automatically give out or validate cash – think ATM machines or change makers. All customers or civilians can use them at their convenience – making things much smoother and cost effective for banking or business operations, and creating a controlled and surveilled transaction area.

     

    Fire Resistant Record Protectors

    This equipment has large insulated areas (containers, doors, drawers, or doors) that can house individually fire/environment/burglar rated containers with room for storing important records. The design of the compartments are organized based on class ratings for impact/attack resistance and safe fall tests.

     

    Room Sized Fireproof Vault

    This special equipment is meant to contain larger materials susceptible to heat ro fire, and can be a somewhat more practical choice over multiple fire rated safes, especially if you’re storing a large amount of items. These vaults are usually employed by larger business or government agencies, and carry some of the highest security class ratings for paper documents or data storage.

    Share Button
    Author:
  • How to Protect your Motorcycle

    Posted on March 17th, 2016 0 Comments

    Unlike the self contained, capsule security of cars, motorcycles’ lack of doors, locks, or hoods makes them especially vulnerable to theft. Anyone can access the engine or internal electronics – especially if you park on the street, and quickly drive off.Like bicycles, motorcycles can easilly be anchored and lfited up. Security creates a need to hybridize the ease-of-access of a motorcycle and the security of a succinct, closed car. In this blog post, I will be detailing some of the realities of motorcycle theft, and providing some detail as how motorcycle owners can prevent their bike from getting stolen.

     

    Statistics of Theft

    The most commonly stolen motorcycles are Honda, with Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki ,and Harley-Davidson leading. Since 2013, all these brands thefts have somewhat diminished, besides Harley-Davidson, which has increased. California is the top state for motorcycle theft, with Texas and New York leading closely behind. The increased usage, hence, street availability of motorcycles in the Summer, makes it the most common season for motorcycle thefts. The higher demand for motorcycle parts during the summer creates a higher incentive for thieves to steal parts from vehicles, which bumps up the theft rate significantly.

     

    How Motorcycles are Stolen

    One common method of stealing a motorcycle is rolling it into a van or truck, and simply driving it away – a rather quick process, especially if the bike isn’t locked and can easily be rolled up a ramp. Even if this isn’t the case, a small collection of people could easily lift the bike. Once inside the van, the motorcycle will no longer be visible to passersby – making it a much more stealthy and inconspicuous theft than driving away in a stolen car. Once the bike arrives at another location, they are able to disassemble the structure of the bike, taking off any security device.

     

    Another method of motorcycle theft involves, simply, the thief starting up the bike and riding away on it. Many people don’t even lock their motorcycles – making it easy for thieves with double sided wafer pics,Try-Outs, or even a combination of determination and a screwdriver to start the ignition and drive away.

     

    How to Protect your Motorcycle

    One possibility is utilizing a ground anchor to fix your motorcycle to the floor of your property – these devices are usually installed inside home garages to maximize security. For those without home garages, this is not a practical option – so the best route to follow is to purchase a high security lock. Most Motorcycle owners prefer Disk Locks or U-Locks to padlocks because they eliminate the need to purchase a heavy chain. They offer increased convenience, but you’re going to need to purchase a few of them if you want to not use a chain at all. Place the U-Lock through the wheel, so it will stop it from rotating, or use it to lock the wheel onto a metal pole or any sort of anchor point. Make sure to invest in a U-Lock that releases on both sides of the shackle – this will cost any bike thief additional time when attempting to steal your bike.

     

    Dick locks can’t be attached to an anchor – they secure your bike through bolting through a hole in the disk break – stopping the bike’s wheel from being able to spin. It’s best to use two disk locks on both wheels, but if you only have one, attach it to the front wheel as it’s much easier for thieves to remove. Don’t ever forget to take off the disk lock before riding your bike.

     

    As far as padlocks go, you have tons of options – but when you’re making your purchase you should be paying heed to the thickness of the material, it’s weight, and the presence of a shroud that covers the sides of the shackle. Rounded cuts on the shackle indicates the presence of ball bearings in the lock, which upgrades its security level. It’s important to utilize multiple padlocks – as this works as both a deterrent method and a surefire way to upgrade the security level of the bike.

     

    Security Chains

    We recommend buying the strongest and sturdiest security chain as possible – these can be secured from various points to add additional padlocks and chains, as the chain is weaved through the multiple open components of the bike to an anchor point. We recommend getting a strong chain as the stronger the chain is, the more likely it is to resist attack from bolt cutters – spring for a chain with at least a 63 rating on the Rockwell scale.

     

    Alarms

    There’s many varieties of alarms – shock sensors, tilt sensors, GPS tracker, proximity sensors, etc. Shock sensors go off if someone hits or shakes the bike. The tilt sensor goes off if the bike is moved from one side to another. GPS notifications tell you the exact location of the bike which is helpful in the event of a theft. And best of all, a remote kill switch allows users to remotely sever the link between the battery and bike starter, rendering the bike incapable of driving.

     

    Theft Insurance

    If you’re really worried about having your bike stolen – whether you can only park your bike away from view or if you live in a high crime area, theft insurance is a fantastic strategy to implement. Think of it this way – if your bike is an investment, it’s worth investing some additional funds to protect and insure it – if the bike ever gets stolen, you can get fully compensated – simply make sure to call the police before you call the insurance brokers, in order to maximize your chances of relocating your vehicle. It’s also a great idea to put custom markings on the motorcycle to aid in it’s recovery – consider utilizing products like DataDot and SmartWater to mark parts on the bike.

     

    In Advance Security

    Make sure to lock your handlebars and place your bike within view of your property – at the very least this will act as a deterrent for any thieves who want to avoid being seen. Make sure that the various layers of security that you use with your bike are separate – meaning that they can’t all be removed in one fell swoop, or can be controlled with a single key. Consider using a motorcycle tarp as a deterrent – even consider buying a tarp branded with the logo of a less appealing motorcycle brand to make potential thieves simply pass by.

     

    It’s important, in bike security, to understand that every bike needs custom levels of protection – do whatever works specifically for you and your situation. Don’t go crazy or overthink things – as long as you stay practical, your security system will be both convenient and effective.

    Share Button
    Author:
  • How to find the right Locksmith

    Posted on September 25th, 2015 0 Comments

    best locksmithChicago is a huge, sprawling city – and there’s lots of individuals who profess to be locksmiths. Finding a locksmith is a task often undertaken spur of the moment, and in a bit of a panic. Most individuals only think about finding a locksmith when they have a broken key or emergency lockout and need immediate assistance. To avoid choosing a shoddy or unprofessional locksmith that overcharges you for unimpressive work, follow the following steps on this checklist. It will help you find a reliable locksmith who’ll provide professional service and a good price.

    Versatility and Experience

    A good locksmith should be able to do any sort of job that relates to locks. Always check the locksmith’s website or call to make sure they can provide you the service you need – and reading a review couldn’t hurt. An experienced locksmith will ensure that their work is done correctly and efficiently. By employing a locksmith with limited training, you risk damaging your door.

    Official License

    Any good locksmith is licensed and officially insured – even if it is not required by their state. Insurance ensures that you will receive compensation if any of your property is damaged or incorrectly fixed – as opposed to a non-insured locksmith who will likely decide to walk away from their shoddy job.

    Mobile Service

    A quality locksmith will either have a local physical location or a mobile service that can come to you at any hour of the day. This way you’re waiting time (along with any travel cost that may factor into your bill) will be minimal.

    Accountability and Trustworthiness

    Good locksmiths provide their customers with an upfront written estimate that factors in all labor operations involved including travel and late night charges. Never use a locksmith that won’t provide a written estimate – as it is likely that they are attempting to unfairly tack on extra fees and up charges. Make sure that your locksmith company does a criminal background check on their employees – as well as making sure that your locksmith’s vehicle is well signed (scam locksmiths often use unmarked vehicles.)

    Finding the right locksmith for you pays off in spades. Chicago Locksmiths offers the highest quality service in the Chicago area for the lowest price. They are fully licensed and all their work is guaranteed to satisfy. Give us a call.

    Share Button
    Author:
  • Preventive Steps in Home Security

    Posted on February 20th, 2015 0 Comments

    Chicago Locksmiths security blog

    Your home is supposed to be a place of safety and refuge. Yet an alarming rise in home invasion robberies around the country is leading many homeowners to believe safety and security is an illusion. It doesn’t have to be, if you’re willing to come to terms with reality and do something about it.

    It’s difficult to say for certain how prevalent home invasion robberies are as compared to residential burglaries. This is primarily due to the fact that FBI crime statistics don’t differentiate between the two. Nonetheless, a home invasion is inherently more dangerous because of the tendency of the perpetrators to use violent force.

     

    Understand the Enemy

    The power behind the home invasion is intimidation. In other words, home invaders act quickly and violently in order to instill fear in the hearts and minds of their victims. This fear enables them to do as they please once inside. Often times occupants are tied up or otherwise incapacitated, allowing the perpetrators to take their time going through the home. They can steal jewelry, electronics, credit cards, cash and anything else they believe is valuable.

    The first step in preventing home invasion is understanding the intimidation factor. Never open your door to anyone who might pose a potential threat. This gives you the upper hand and prevents potential invaders from assuming you are already frightened. If you decide to speak to a potential intruder, be firm and confident.

    Understanding your enemy also means knowing why you might be targeted. Most home invasions are not random; criminals come to your home because they’re looking for something. This means you need to be diligent about protecting your privacy. Be aware that the car you drive, the clothes you wear, the way you carry yourself and the way you communicate tells criminals a lot about you. Be private and carry yourself with confidence.

     

    Preventing Entry

    Home invaders use intimidation to subdue their victims; they use violent force to enter a home. To prevent such entries, you should start by installing double key, deadbolt locks in all first-floor doors. Also be sure to use four-screw strike plates as they make it more difficult for intruders to kick your door in. Solid core and steel doors are another good line of defense against home invasion.

    The reality of home invasion is an unfortunate part of the modern world. Learn how to protect yourself and your family.

     

    Key Preventive Steps in Home Security

        Install solid core doors, heavy duty locks, and window security devices
        Lock all doors, windows, and garages at all times
        Use the door peephole BEFORE opening the door
        Use four three-inch screws to secure heavy duty lock strike plates in the door frame
        Use your porch light to help you to see clearly outside
        Never rely on a chain-latch as a barrier to partially open the door
        Never open the door to strangers or solicitors
        Call the police if the stranger acts suspicious
        Alert your neighbors to suspicious solicitors
        Hold a family meeting to discuss home security plans
        Set the home perimeter alarm at night, if you have one

    Share Button
    Author:
  • The Evolution of Mul-T-Lock

    Posted on January 9th, 2015 0 Comments

    MulTlocks 

    Mul-T-Lock was founded by Moshe Dolev and Avraham Bahry In 1973. They entered the market with a 4-way multipoint lock; and, it made such an impact that soon Mul-T-Lock products were carried in the highest-security locksmith stores. Moshe Dolev and Avraham Bahry and the Mul-T-Lock brand became the emblem of the high-security market and in 41 years, that hasn’t changed.

     

    Sticking to innovation

     Moshe Dolev and Avraham Bahry built their first lock on an innovative idea. To remain leaders of an evolving market, both Moshe Dolev and Avraham Bahry needed to equip the Mul-T-Lock brand with fresh ideas and solutions to achieve new levels of security and set new standards and grades for new and existing products on the market. This included taking mechanical cylinders, deadbolts, key fobs, wireless locks and smartphone useable electronics to never before seen results.

     

    Loyal Partners

     Mul-T-Lock uses expert technicians to install and supply their products. Interactive®+, MT5®+ as well as electromechanical CLIQ e-cylinders are imperative to the new security market and take professionals to install and fix if necessary. When loyalty meets security results everyone prospers. The benefit of this helps stores stand behind their product and clients who purchase the product feel as if the investment was worth their time and money. Mul-T-Lock has built a business around loyalty.

     

    Whats ahead?

     With the onset of a heavy push to go digital with security, some users and retailers fear that these advances in security will be lesser accessible to them. For a complete access control panel like the SMARTair®, Mul-T-Lock has erased the worry and concern. In their 41 years, they’ve continued to do one thing incredibly well. And that is supplying information about their products in clear and informative ways. User interfaces with Mul-T-Lock are extraordinarily simple. Don’t fear the wireless.

     

    Mul-T-Lock is here to stay

     Mul-T-Lock USA, Inc. president, Roy Miller recently said that, “For me, and hopefully for our customers, there is a true value in my coming from the locksmith channel. Having been a part of this ever-changing industry for so many years, I’ve always been in a position to understand the specific needs and the unique challenges that our locksmiths encounter, but now I’m in a position to really do something about it. Now I can offer solutions made by a locksmith and for a locksmith; it’s very exciting.”

     If there is one thing for certain, it’s that what began with Moshe Dolev and Avraham Bahry is continuing with Roy Miller. The future of technology couldn’t look brighter than it does today. The Mul-T-Lock brand is about to promote one of the most profound evolutions to security. Residential properties and commercial properties are deploying these locks as quick as they can. There isn’t a better investment and more reliable results than those found at Mul-T-Lock.

     

    Mul-T-Lock Sold and Install in Chicago

     Chicago Locksmiths is a premier locksmith company that only picks the best locks for their clients.  Chicago Locksmiths install Mul-T-Lock deadbolts, handle sets, levers, knobs, electronic locks, light commercial locks and Mul-T-Lock residential locks. 

    Share Button
    Author:
  • LISCIO Electronic Keypad Leverset with Bluetooth Programming

    Posted on August 19th, 2014 0 Comments

    Chicago blog keypad

    Looking for the latest and greatest in home entry systems? Throw away that key and check out the LISCIO Electronic Keypad Leverset with Bluetooth Programming from Emtek. This sleek, simple system will enable you to enter your home conveniently with the simple touch of a few discreet buttons. The LISCIO keypad employs Bluetooth programming from your Smartphone, taking advantage of the latest technological advances to provide you with secure and simple access to your home. Take a look at this era’s keyless entry system.

    Specifications and Features

    The LISCIO keypad leverset features a beautifully sleek design that won’t detract from the curb appeal of your home. The security buttons are smoothly integrated into the handle. This integration provides a discreet system that will prevent you from having to look at an ugly, glaring keypad such as those found on warehouse sets. The leverset is available in a polished chrome finish, an oil rubbed bronze finish and a satin nickel finish in order to match a wide variety of design styles.
    The set has an adjustable latch and can fit doors ranging in thickness from 1.75 inches to 2.25 inches. The leverset can be used on both exterior and interior doors and has been weatherproofed specifically for outdoor conditions. You can install one on each exterior door as well as on any interior doors that require extra safekeeping. A low battery indicator light lets you know when it’s time to replace the batteries on your unit.
    Additional features include a small lever footprint that measures just under three inches by just over four and a half inches on the exterior, with interior measurements of two and a quarter inches by six and a half inches. A standard 9-volt battery system can be found housed on the interior trim of the set. The leverset also comes with an exterior key cylinder for backup entry, just in case, making it a versatile and functional set that works under any circumstance.

    How it Works

    Setting up this leverset is a simple process with the help of your Apple or Android phone. After installing a free app available through the Apple store or Google Play, the app wizard will direct you through the steps of setting up your set. This system allows multiple user codes, which you can add, edit or delete through your Smartphone app.
    The app also enables you to view a log of which user code has been entered at what time of day, allowing you to keep a close eye on the security of your home. Additionally, you can manage multiple locks from one device, and all of your existing information can easily be communicated to a new device should you change or update your phone. Safe, smart security has never been so simple.

    Conclusion

    Your home is your castle. It’s important to safeguard it with the best security system available to you. With the LISCIO Electronic Keypad Leverset with Bluetooth Programming from Emtek, you’ll be able to rest in the knowledge that your home is secure.

    Share Button
    Author:
  • Rekeying A Lock

    Posted on August 12th, 2014 0 Comments

    chicago lock

    You’ll usually want to rekey the locks to your home, office or car if there is a break-in, theft or act of vandalism. You may also wish to rekey your locks if you lose your keys, if you feel that too many others have copies of your keys or if you want the convenience of being able to lock and unlock your house’s front and back doors with the same key. You can go to a locksmith to rekey your locks or you can do it yourself. Here are 8 steps Chicago Locksmith provides for rekeying your lock.

     

    1. Get a rekeying kit. Also called pinning kits, rekeying kits are available at most hardware stores and home centers, as well as online.

    2. Remove the exterior door knob or lock face.

    3. Take out the lock cylinder. Using a cylinder follower (a small brass tube), push the cylinder through the assembly to remove the sleeve covering it and then remove the cylinder.

    4. Remove the cylinder retainer ring. Use a wrench-like ring remover to remove the retaining ring from the lock cylinder. Put the retainer ring somewhere you’ll find it later when reassembling the lock.

    5. Take out the cylinder plug.

    6. Take out the old lower lock pins. The lower lock pins are roughly bullet-shaped, with the pointed ends touching the key, and of varying lengths.

    7. Insert the new lock key in the cylinder. This will push the springs out of the way and serve as a partial guide for the new lock pins.

    8. Insert the new pins in the lock. The new pins should be color-coded or coded numerically to match a chart showing which pin goes where in the lock. You’ll need either a tweezers or small needle-nosed pliers to grip the pins and insert them. The new pins should align with the key when it is inserted in the lock.

    9. Reassemble the lock. Replace the cylinder plug and retaining ring, then replace the cylinder in the door knob or lock face and reattach it to the door. Test the rekeyed lock to make sure it locks and unlocks with the new key.

    Choose to have the professionals do it – call us 312.878.2715 or visit: ChicagoLocksmiths.net

     

    Share Button
    Author:
Evicted - we provide eviction services throughtout Westchester County and New York City Find Out More
©Copyright 2010 ChicagoLocksmiths.net | All Rights Reserved