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Monthly Archives: July 2016

  • Benefits of having both manual and electronic locks

    Posted on July 23rd, 2016 0 Comments

    Benefits of having both manual and electronic locks

    People are often polarized to one or the other side of the lock spectrum, arguing for the sole benefits of maintaining manual or electrical security systems in their homes or businesses. These arguments often follow alongside the conversational progression of dogma – in that they are single minded in their argumentative approach. The benefits of maintaining an electric lock system doesn’t cancel out the benefits of a mechanical system, and the benefits of a mechanical system doesn’t cancel out the benefits of an electronic system. In fact, both these systems have unique benefits that when combined can highly strengthen the security infrastructure of homes or businesses. In this blog entry I’ll detail the benefits of both.

     

    Benefits of Electronic Locks

    This is a matter of convenience. Instead of having to dig through your bag or pockets for your keys when you’re arriving home tired, or leaving home in a rush, you can simply input a code (or in some cases simply shut the door) and rest easy knowing that your home is being adequately protected. These systems often work according to fail safe principles – they have backup batteries that will keep the doors protected even in the case of power outages that take other electronic systems off the grid of operation.

     

    Benefits of Manual Locks

    Manual locks are fantastic not only because of their classic visual appeal, but for their sturdiness and resilience. While many electronic lock systems are designed with fail safe principles nowadays, it wouldn’t hurt to have a strong manual lock system bolstering the solid protection of the door in the event of a power outage or any major security risk situation. With manual locks, making sure that the whole family or business has access to your space is super simple; it’s as easy as making a copy of the key to give them.

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  • Skeleton Keys

    Posted on July 17th, 2016 0 Comments

    Skeleton Keys

    Skeleton Keys have always carried an element of mystery as they have been central plot devices of many mystery and detective stories. However, despite their shrouded reputation, there’s no magic or mystery to skeleton keys – they operate according to simple mechanics. Let’s learn what skeleton keys are all about.

    What are they?

    When most people hear “skeleton key” they think about an old fashioned looking key with an extended neck and rounded/decorative top. There are actually two kinds of keys that are known as skeleton keys. Old fashioned skeleton keys work with old fashioned warded locks – these are only really found now in older furniture, however due to how easily they can be picked, these hollow locks aren’t really used anymore. These locks take skeleton keys, barrelled, rounded shaft keys. The projections inside warded lock key holes blocks flat or incorrect keys from turning inside it, making it necessary for a key to be made that exactly matched the projections inside the lock.

     

    Master Keys

    These keys are also referred to as skeleton keys; these masters fit inside multiple locks within one facility, for example in hotels or schools. While many individual keys are fashioned to only open one door, the master key is able to open any door, including ones that some of the single-door keys can also open. Pin and tumbler style locks can be opened by multiple keys – the single key designated to that door, as well as a master key. This is made possible by situating a 3rd pin near the first two – that can be raised according to the dimensions of the key that would be used.

     

    Both these keys work according to mechanics – no electricity, codes, or programming is needed. The locksmith accomplishes the simple task of making a key that matches the mechanical aspects of the lock, whether the internal mechanisms are a series of tumbler, pins, or channels, or a old fashioned warded lock.

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  • Famous Locks of History

    Posted on July 13th, 2016 0 Comments

     

    Famous Lock Related Incidents of HistoryLocks have existed for thousands of years – just in different forms. In this blog post, we’ll survey some of the most notable moments in lock history.

    Ancient India Locks

    During the reign of the Emperor of Annam, expensive valuables were locked inside large blocks of wood that were kept on islands or inside an elaborate pool inside the courts of the palace. They were protected by a crew of crocodiles called guardian angels, that were fed so little that they were always starving – to go inside the water would mean you would get eaten.

     Gordian Knot Locks

    Rope cords made of fiber were used to secure doors for hundreds of years. The famous Gordian Knot, tied by GOrdius, the King of Phrygia, was secured to his chariot – it was foretold by oracles that it’s untying would be accomplished by the man who would go on to conquer Asia. When Alexander the Great couldn’t untie the Gordian Knot, he cut it apart quickly with his sword – giving way to the expression “cutting the Gordian knot” – meaning providing a swift solution when other lighter methods don’t work.

     The Gothic Ages Locks

    During this time period, locksmiths created beautiful ornamental locks with vast intricacy. THey would emboss, engrave, chafe, and etch onto metallic locks, creating security devices for the finest courts throughout Europe. Castle doors would be secured inside ward locks, domes that would often be covered in mythical symbols and characters, as well as metal coloring, known as the Niello process.

     

    Colonial America Locks

    During Pioneer days, home’s keys would often hang outside the door as a length of string – the doors were latched from the inside with a wooden bar or belt that would drop into a hollow area in the jamb. A piece of string was attached that would be threaded to the door’s exterior. The dangling string would signal a welcome to visitors, who could simply pull the string and open the door. This is the origin of the phrase “our latch string is always out.” as an expression of hospitality.

     

    Spanish Architecture Locks

    In 17th and 18th century Spain, there was a general dislike of locks. In order to stay safe, a block would collectively hire a watchman to patrol the neighborhood who owned keys to their homes. In order to leave or enter their home, a homeowner would clap their hands in order to signal the watchman to come.

     

    Deep Sea Locksmiths

    Charles Courtney always wanted to be a locksmith, but ended up a deep sea diver. Fortunately, he was able to meet his dreams when he started getting hired to open locked safes on sunken ships – retrieving millions of dollars for salvaging operations.

     

    Animal Shaped Locks

    Throughout history, high end locks in the shapes of animals were made in order to delight homeowner’s and frighten off superstitious intruders. From elephants and hippopotamuses, to stranger forms like flowers or even scorpions, locks of every specific shape or size exist in history.

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  • Skeleton Keys

    Posted on July 7th, 2016 0 Comments

    Skeleton Keys

    Skeleton Keys have always carried an element of mystery as they have been central plot devices of many mystery and detective stories. However, despite their shrouded reputation, there’s no magic or mystery to skeleton keys – they operate according to simple mechanics. Let’s learn what skeleton keys are all about.

    What are they?

    When most people hear “skeleton key” they think about an old fashioned looking key with an extended neck and rounded/decorative top. There are actually two kinds of keys that are known as skeleton keys. Old fashioned skeleton keys work with old fashioned warded locks – these are only really found now in older furniture, however due to how easily they can be picked, these hollow locks aren’t really used anymore. These locks take skeleton keys, barrelled, rounded shaft keys. The projections inside warded lock key holes blocks flat or incorrect keys from turning inside it, making it necessary for a key to be made that exactly matched the projections inside the lock.

     

    Master Keys

    These keys are also referred to as skeleton keys; these masters fit inside multiple locks within one facility, for example in hotels or schools. While many individual keys are fashioned to only open one door, the master key is able to open any door, including ones that some of the single-door keys can also open. Pin and tumbler style locks can be opened by multiple keys – the single key designated to that door, as well as a master key. This is made possible by situating a 3rd pin near the first two – that can be raised according to the dimensions of the key that would be used.

     

    Both these keys work according to mechanics – no electricity, codes, or programming is needed. The locksmith accomplishes the simple task of making a key that matches the mechanical aspects of the lock, whether the internal mechanisms are a series of tumbler, pins, or channels, or a old fashioned warded lock.

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